Research Areas

Through the cross-disciplinary research of physical, chemical and biological processes in engineered systems, we can achieve cleaner air and water worldwide.

The rapid pace of globalization provides unprecedented opportunity for developed and developing countries to restructure and grow their economies. However, society must meet the heightened demand for energy and goods through responsible, sustainable sources and with technologies that will have limited environmental impact, such as materials and devices for solar photovoltaics and new pathways for biofuel and biochemical production.

We must create and improve the infrastructure required to ensure the highest quality of environmental and human health, which will require both fundamental and applied research in order to address environmental challenges comprehensively.

 

 

Martin, Pappu, Yang among most highly-cited researchers worldwidehttps://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Martin-Pappu-Yang-among-most-highly-cited-researchers-worldwide.aspxMartin, Pappu, Yang among most highly-cited researchers worldwideRandall Martin and Lan Yang are among the world's most highly-cited researchers in the sciences. <img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/Martin%20Yang%20Rohit.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />
New partnership brings together McKelvey, IIT Bombay to study air pollutionhttps://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/New-partnership-brings-together-McKelvey,-IIT-Bombay-to-study-air-pollution.aspxNew partnership brings together McKelvey, IIT Bombay to study air pollutionNew aerosol science research facility, joint master's degree gives students best of two powerhouse research institutions<img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/mb03%20(1).jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />
Analyzing characteristics of fine particles in the air from spacehttps://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Analyzing-characteristics-of-fine-particles-in-the-air-from-space.aspxAnalyzing characteristics of fine particles in the air from spaceRandall Martin will take a new set measurements of ground levels of fine particulate matter, PM2.5, in regions observed from NASA's MAIA satellites.<img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/maia1%20(1).jpg?RenditionID=2" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />