https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Toxic-legacy-Wash-U-researchers-look-for-ways-to-keep-lead-out-of-drinking-water.aspx996In the media: Toxic legacy: Wash U researchers look for ways to keep lead out of drinking water<img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/1227_SF_Lead_01.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>​Dan Giammar collects something most people want to get rid of: lead pipes.</p>“This is just a great piece of lead pipe,” said Giammar, turning the smooth cylinder in his hands.<div><br/>The Washington University professor of environmental engineering is testing ways to keep lead pipes from dissolving and leaching into drinking water. Using old pipes from across the country, Giammar’s lab is working to understand whether adding a non-toxic compound to drinking water could prevent lead release.</div><div><br/>Water pipes were often made of lead until the 1940s, partly because it’s a soft material that’s easy to bend.<br/><br/></div><div>Lead pipes also last an average of 35 years — more than twice as long as iron.</div><div><br/>But they also make us sick.</div><div><br/>We now know lead pipes dissolve over time and contaminate drinking water, causing a multitude of health problems from reduced kidney function to premature birth.</div><div><br/>Despite early warnings from medical professionals in the 1920s, lead pipes were installed in cities across the country until World War II.<br/><br/>For its part, the lead industry led a robust campaign to promote the use of lead in household goods, including a 1923 advertisement in National Geographic announcing “Lead helps to guard your health.”</div><div><br/>St. Louis, like many cities, installed tens of thousands of lead service lines, which connect the water main to individual homes. Today, there are an estimated 50,000 lead service lines remaining in the city, but Giammar said this isn’t necessarily cause for alarm.</div><div><br/>To keep lead from leaching into the water, the St. Louis Water Department adjusts the water pH.</div><div><br/>“Our concentrations of lead in the water are among the lowest in the country,” he said. “The relatively high pH of our water and the hardness of the water — which is the calcium and magnesium, and the alkalinity — seem to be quite protective against lead release.”</div><div><br/></div><div><a href="http://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/toxic-legacy-wash-u-researchers-look-ways-keep-lead-out-drinking-water?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=Toxic%20legacy%3A%20Wash%20U%20researchers%20look%20for%20ways%20to%20keep%20lead%20out%20of%20drinking%20water&utm_campaign=newsletter_LRL#stream/0">>> Read the full article on St. Louis Public Radio</a><br/></div><div><div class="cstm-section"><h3>Daniel Giammar<br/></h3><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong> <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Daniel-Giammar.aspx?_ga=2.170919141.452849903.1540303982-757045394.1533662676"> <img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Giammar_Daniel.jpg?RenditionID=3" alt="Daniel Giammar" style="margin: 5px;"/></a> <br/></strong></div><ul style="text-align: left;"><li>Walter E. Browne Professor of Environmental Engineering</li><li>Expertise: Water quality, aquatic chemistry, and environmental implications of energy technologies<br/></li></ul><p style="text-align: center;"> <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Daniel-Giammar.aspx?_ga=2.170919141.452849903.1540303982-757045394.1533662676">>> View Bio</a><br/></p></div></div> <br/>Washington University graduate student Anushka Mishrra tests water samples for chlorine on Nov. 21, 2018, as part of a lead-corrosion study. SHAHLA FARZAN | ST. LOUIS PUBLIC RADIOShahla Farzan, St. Louis Public Radiohttp://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/toxic-legacy-wash-u-researchers-look-ways-keep-lead-out-drinking-water?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=Toxic%20legacy%3A%20Wash%20U%20researchers%20look%20for%20ways%20to%20keep%20lead%20out%20of%20dr2018-12-28T06:00:00Z​Could adding a non-toxic compound to drinking water could prevent lead release?<p>​Could adding a non-toxic compound to drinking water could prevent lead release? <a href="/news/Pages/Treatment-for-lead-in-drinking-water-is-evolving-Will-the-U-S-EPA-catch-up.aspx">>> Read the full article on St. Louis Public Radio</a><br/></p>
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Top-WashU-Engineering-stories-of-2018.aspx984Top WashU Engineering stories of 2018<p>​WashU engineers continued their strong research tradition in 2018. Here are 10 stories that had the most impact and reach in 2018:<br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/top%2010%20stories%202018.jpg?RenditionID=12" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div class="newsauthor"><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"> <a href="/news/Pages/Deans-Podcast-Engineering-the-Future.aspx" style="font-family: "libre baskerville", "times new roman", serif; font-size: 1.25em; background-color: #ffffff; color: #9e0918; outline: 0px;">1. Engineering the Future: The Future of Energy</a><br/></div><div><div data-queryruleid="00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000"><div data-displaytemplate="WebPageItem"><div>The first episode of Dean Aaron Bobick’s new podcast features Professors Vijay Ramani and Rich Axelbaum.</div><div><br/></div><div class="newsauthor"><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"> <a href="/news/Pages/New-faculty-join-School-of-Engineering--Applied-Science-.aspx" style="background-color: #ffffff; font-family: "libre baskerville", "times new roman", serif; font-size: 1.25em;">2. New faculty join School of Engineering & Applied Science</a><br/></div><div><div data-queryruleid="00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000"><div data-displaytemplate="WebPageItem"><div><div class="newsauthor">A diverse group of new faculty joins the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis, bringing the total number to 96.5 during the 2018-2019 academic year.<br/></div></div><div> <br/> </div><div><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <a href="/news/Pages/Cancer-immunotherapy-target-of-WashU-mechanobiology-research.aspx" style="outline: 0px;">3. Cancer immunotherapy target of WashU mechanobiology research</a><br/></h3><div class="newsauthor">One of the latest treatments for cancer is immunotherapy, which involves genetically modifying a patient’s own immune cells to fight tumor growth and spread. An engineer and an immunology researcher at Washington University in St. Louis are collaborating to find a better way to prepare and treat these immune cells to maximize their effectiveness in patients.<br/></div><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"> <br/> </div><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <a href="/news/Pages/Sinopoli-named-chair-of-WashU-electrical-systems-engineering.aspx">4. Sinopoli named chair of WashU electrical & systems engineering</a><br/></h3><div class="newsauthor">Sinopoli represents 'a new generation of electrical engineers'<br/></div><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"> <br/> <h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"></h3><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <a href="/news/Pages/In-the-media-WashU-startup-SentiAR-Inc--awarded-$2-2M-NIH-grant.aspx">5. In the media: WashU startup SentiAR Inc. awarded $2.2M NIH grant</a><br/></h3><div class="newsauthor">SentiAR Inc., a startup that spun out of Washington University in St. Louis’ School of Medicine and School of Engineering last year, has been getting a lot of media attention.<br/><br/></div><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <a href="/news/Pages/New-imaging-technique-to-use-bioinspired-camera-to-study-tendon,-ligament-damage-.aspx">6. New imaging technique <g class="gr_ gr_46 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar multiReplace" id="46" data-gr-id="46">use</g> <g class="gr_ gr_44 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar only-ins doubleReplace replaceWithoutSep" id="44" data-gr-id="44">bioinspired</g> camera to study tendon, ligament damage</a><br/></h3><div class="newsauthor"><g class="gr_ gr_45 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="45" data-gr-id="45">Camera</g> uses polarized light to measure changes in ligament often injured by baseball pitchers<br/></div></div> <br/> </div></div><div><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <a href="/news/Pages/A-first-look-at-McKelvey-Hall.aspx" style="outline: 0px;">7. A first look at McKelvey Hall</a><br/></h3><div class="newsauthor">It’s the final piece of the East End Transformation at Washington University in St. Louis, and new renderings of James M. McKelvey, Sr. Hall demonstrate how the building will incorporate seamlessly into the project.<br/></div> <br/> </div><div><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <a href="/news/Pages/Bigger-proteins,-stronger-threads-Biosynthetic-spider-silk-Fuzhong-Zhang-Biomacromolecules.aspx">8. Bigger proteins, stronger threads: Synthetic spider silk</a><br/></h3><div class="newsauthor">Engineering scientists use bacteria to create biosynthetic silk threads stronger and tougher than before<br/></div> <br/> </div><div><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <a href="/news/Pages/Making-sense-pictures-of-medical-data-Alvitta-Ottley.aspx">9. Making sense of pictures, medical data</a><br/></h3><div class="newsauthor">Improved visual communication with patients could lead to more informed health-care choices.<br/></div><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"> <br/> </div><div class="newscaption" style="line-height: 1.5;"><h3 style="margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 0px;"> <a href="/news/Pages/Hopeful-technology-could-change-detection-diagnosis-of-deadly-ovarian-cancer.aspx">10. 'Hopeful technology' could change detection, diagnosis of deadly ovarian cancer</a><br/></h3><div class="newsauthor">Ovarian cancer claims the lives of more than 14,000 women in the U.S. each year, ranking fifth among cancer deaths in women. A multidisciplinary team at Washington University in St. Louis <g class="gr_ gr_41 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar multiReplace" id="41" data-gr-id="41">has</g> found an innovative way to use sound and light, or photoacoustic, imaging to diagnose ovarian tumors, which may lead to a promising new diagnostic imaging technique to improve <g class="gr_ gr_40 gr-alert gr_gramm gr_inline_cards gr_run_anim Grammar only-ins replaceWithoutSep" id="40" data-gr-id="40">current</g> standard of care for patients with ovarian cancer. <br/></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div></div><div class="cstm-section"><h3>#washuengineers top social media posts of the year<br/></h3><div><strong></strong></div><div><p><strong>facebook:</strong><strong> </strong><a href="https://www.facebook.com/washuengineering/videos/10155903636723095/">Engineering alumnus Bob Behnken chosen as one of NASA's astronauts who will fly spacecraft to and from the International Space Station.</a><br/></p><p><strong>twitter:</strong><strong> </strong><a href="https://twitter.com/WashUengineers/status/973253695117971461">Who earned the first U.S. medal of the 2018 @Paralympics? A WashU engineer — Kendall Gretsch '14!</a><br/></p><p><strong>instagram: </strong><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BhHtv6LBaP5/">Catch 'em if you can. More rain in #STL now... #WashU #cherryblossoms</a><br/></p></div></div><p><br/></p>2018-12-17T06:00:00ZWashU engineers continued their strong research tradition in 2018. These are 10 stories that had the most impact and reach in 2018.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/McDonnell-Scholar-wins-Three-Minute-Thesis-competition.aspx990McDonnell Scholar wins Three Minute Thesis competition<img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/Po-Cheng-300x200.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>​Graduate student and McDonnell International Scholars Academy scholar Po-Cheng Lin delivered a <a class="nothumblink button" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qN9m_9ss2Mk&list=PLb9ODR3vzQJPB0Rb5eVtzpEbHDBMfCvmU&t=0s&index=9">winning presentation</a> at the Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition held at the McDonnell Academy’s 7th International <a href="https://global.wustl.edu/mcdonnell-academy-7th-international-symposium/?_ga=2.257521667.967039981.1545061354-757045394.1533662676">Symposium</a> in Beijing.</p>Lin is a fourth-year graduate student in energy, environmental and chemical engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science. As one of five finalists competing in the 3MT at the symposium co-hosted by Tsinghua University and Washington University, he won both the 3MT Judges’ and People’s Choice Prizes in the energy and environment category. <div> <br/>Lin is doing his thesis work in the lab of Himadri Pakrasi, professor in the Department of Biology in Arts & Sciences and director of the International Center for Energy, Environment and Sustainability. He is being co-advised by Fuzhong Zhang, associate professor of energy, environmental and chemical engineering.</div><div> <br/>Visit the <a href="https://biology.wustl.edu/news/lab-bench-stage-mcdonnell-international-scholars-journey-winning-three-minute-thesis?_ga=2.187134112.967039981.1545061354-757045394.1533662676">biology department website</a> to read more about the competition.<br/></div>LinThe Sourcehttps://source.wustl.edu/2018/12/mcdonnell-scholar-wins-three-minute-thesis-competition/2018-12-17T06:00:00ZGraduate student and McDonnell International Scholars Academy scholar Po-Cheng Lin delivered a winning presentation at the Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition held at the McDonnell Academy’s 7th International Symposium in Beijing.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/WashU-Expert-Climate-Assessment-makes-clear-the-cost-of-inaction.aspx972WashU Expert: Climate Assessment makes clear the cost of inaction<img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/180402_jaa_dan_giammar_lab_0071-760x506.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p></p>The many scientists behind the <a href="https://nca2018.globalchange.gov/">National Climate Assessment</a>, released the day after Thanksgiving, have provided something of a price tag, says a Washington University in St. Louis expert on mitigation and sequestration.<div><br/>“Thanks to this report, we can now weigh the cost of climate change versus the cost of mitigation,” said <a href="https://eece.wustl.edu/faculty/Pages/faculty.aspx?bio=53&_ga=2.154915135.645756809.1543251135-757045394.1533662676">Daniel Giammar</a>, the Walter E. Browne Professor of​ Environmental Engineering​ in the School of Engineering & Applied Science. <br/><br/>“We currently have three main ways to reduce the emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere,” Giammar said. “We can use more renewables, a shift we have been slowly making in the United States. We can transition from coal to natural gas, which helps,” he said, “though isn’t a long-term solution.</div><div> <br/>“Then there’s carbon capture and sequestration,” or capturing carbon and storing it in a way that keeps it from entering the atmosphere, where it would otherwise contribute to warming, he said.</div><div> <br/>Giammar noted that this approach has already been demonstrated at scale with projects that have sequestered more than one million tons of carbon dioxide underground, and <a href="https://source.wustl.edu/2018/04/trap-contain-and-convert/">this is an approach that his research group has studied</a>. </div><div> <br/>“The technology has come a long way in the past 10 years,” he said.  At the moment, the main barrier to implementation is economics, because it’s free to emit carbon dioxide.</div><div><br/>“The report looks at the costs of doing nothing,” Giammar said. “The benefits of mitigation are now quantified. It’s a good guide for determining what we’re willing to pay.”</div><div><div class="cstm-section"><h3>Daniel Giammar<br/></h3><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Daniel-Giammar.aspx?_ga=2.170919141.452849903.1540303982-757045394.1533662676"><img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Giammar_Daniel.jpg?RenditionID=3" alt="Daniel Giammar" style="margin: 5px;"/></a> <br/></strong></div><ul style="text-align: left;"><li>Walter E. Browne Professor of Environmental Engineering</li><li>Expertise: Water quality, aquatic chemistry, and environmental implications of energy technologies<br/></li></ul><p style="text-align: center;"> <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Daniel-Giammar.aspx?_ga=2.170919141.452849903.1540303982-757045394.1533662676">>> View Bio</a><br/></p></div></div>Giammar's new research quantifies the rate at which carbon dioxide can covert to an inert mineral when injected into underground basalt flows. (Photo: Joe Angeles/Washington University)Brandie Jeffersonhttps://source.wustl.edu/2018/11/washu-expert-climate-assessment-makes-clear-the-cost-of-inaction/2018-11-30T06:00:00Z​Professor Giammar discusses three main ways to reduce the emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere<p>​Professor Giammar discusses three main ways to reduce the emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere<br/></p>
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Dantas-and-Moon-team-receives-3-point-five-million-dollar-grant-from-NIH.aspx971Moon and Dantas team receives $3.5M grant from NIH<img alt="" src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Moon_Tae-Seok.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>​Gautam Dantas and Thaddeus Stappenbeck, both at the School of Medicine, and Tae Seok Moon, at the School of Engineering & Applied Science, received a $3.5 million grant from the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to study how live bacteria can be used for drug delivery.<br/></p><p><img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Moon_Tae-Seok.jpg?RenditionID=6" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/><img src="https://publichealth.wustl.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/dantas_350.jpg" alt="" style="margin: 5px; width: 298px;"/><br/></p>Beth Miller 2018-11-29T06:00:00ZGrant will allow team to study how live bacteria can be used for drug delivery