https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/2018-Discovery-Competition-Finalists-selected.aspx8552018 Discovery Competition Finalists selected<p>​Four teams have been chosen as finalists for the 2018 <a href="/current-students/outside-classroom/discovery-competition/Pages/default.aspx">Discovery Competition</a>. The winning teams will be chosen at 6 p.m., Tuesday, April 24 in Rodin Auditorium in Green Hall.<br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/Discovery-Competition-1230x431.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/36_.000">a</a></div><p>The finalists are:<br/></p><p><strong>CyberPowered Home </strong>— This team has developed a smart breaker box that automatically senses, interprets and acts on electrical use information. The team says the box can help homeowners save an estimated 25 percent on energy bills while enjoying a more responsive and convenient smart home, and will help utility companies smooth demand, respond to events, make predictions and streamline operational costs and complexity. <br/></p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Team members:<br/></p><ul><li>Will Blanchard, who is expected to graduate in May with a bachelor’s degree in computer engineering and bachelor’s in applied science in systems engineering;<br/></li><li>Allen Nikka, who earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering in 2017 and is earning a master’s in computer science in 2018;<br/></li><li>Brennan Morell, who is expected to graduate in May with a bachelor’s degree in computer science;<br/></li><li>Danny Andreev, who is expected to earn a bachelor’s and master’s in electrical engineering and a bachelor’s degree in computer science in 2020.<br/></li><li><a href="/news/Documents/EDC%20Intro%20Slides%20CyberPowered%20Home-2.pdf">View company profile (.pdf)</a><br/></li></ul><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p><strong>OpCoderAI </strong>—<strong> </strong>This team has developed a software tool that streamlines the health-care billing and reimbursement process using artificial intelligence and natural language processing. By working as both a supplement to human coders and an auditing tool for hospital administrators, OpCoder AI seeks to revolutionize the efficiency and accuracy of the hospital reimbursement process.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Team members:</p><ul><li>Peter Delaney, who is expected to graduate in May with a bachelor’s degree in global health & environment;<br/></li><li>Will Luer, who is expected to graduate in May with a master’s in engineering in computer science & engineering and earned a bachelor’s in mechanical engineering in 2017;<br/></li><li>Adith Boloor, who earned a master’s in engineering in robotics in December 2017.<br/></li></ul><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p><strong>Stocksights</strong> — This team has developed an automated and interpretable investment analysis platform to help everyday investors make smarter investment decisions. By taking advantage of recent developments in commission-free trading and advances in computational power, the team brings many of the portfolio optimization techniques that were previously limited to professional asset managers to self-directed investors, ultimately providing consumers with fully personalized and meaningful investment guidance.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Team members:</p><ul><li>Jon Gross, who earned a bachelor’s in systems science & engineering in 2016 and is expected to graduate in May with a bachelor’s in applied science – mechanical engineering and a master’s in engineering data analytics & statistics;<br/></li><li>Anton Salem, a sophomore majoring in systems science & engineering;<br/></li></ul><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p><strong>UKnit</strong> — This team has developed a 3-D printer for clothing that allows small companies to sample designs in-house and to scale to meet demand.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Team members:<br/></p><ul><li>Andrew O’Sullivan, who is expected to graduate in May with a bachelor’s in mechanical engineering;<br/></li><li>Sam Fortmann, who is expected to graduate in May with a bachelor’s in mechanical engineering;<br/></li><li>Daniel Martin, who is expected to graduate in May with a bachelor’s in mechanical engineering and a master’s in aerospace engineering.<br/></li></ul><SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN><br/>With the goal of promoting new and innovative discoveries to solve challenges or needs, the School of Engineering & Applied Science created the Discovery Competition in 2012. 2018-04-23T05:00:00Z
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Meet-the-Class-of-2018-Valedictorians.aspx853Meet the Class of 2018 Valedictorians<img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/_72O9324.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p> <strong>​Jessi Gray</strong> will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in computer science with a minor in math. After graduation, she plans to return to her native Boston for the summer for a much-needed break, then work in the tech field for a couple of years before pursuing a master’s degree.<br/></p><p> <strong>Sydney Katz</strong> will graduate with bachelor’s degrees in electrical engineering and applied science (systems science & engineering) with a minor in applied microeconomics. She will begin graduate school in aerospace engineering at Stanford University next fall.<br/></p><p> <strong>Nikhil Patel</strong> will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering with a minor in bioinformatics. He will remain at WashU for another year earning a master’s in computer science while applying to medical school.<br/></p><p> <strong>Vanessa Wu</strong> will graduate with a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering with a second major in economic strategy and a minor in energy engineering. After graduating, she will begin working with Boston Consulting Group in Dallas.<br/></p><h3> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/Jessi%20Gray.JPG?RenditionID=7" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/>Jessi Gray<br/></h3><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p> <strong>What is your advice to future WashU students? </strong>My advice to future WashU students is to make sure to explore the school beyond its academic components. Don’t just go to school, go to college! I learned a lot more outside the classroom than I did inside. Only this semester did I really start taking full advantage of being surrounded by so many people with different backgrounds and interests. I’ve been trying to get more involved in things I’m passionate about, to make new friends and to start more conversations with strangers. There are so many different people here – all with their own stories – that you can learn from and relate to. But that can only happen once you step outside the classroom, outside your comfort zone, and into the world.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p> <strong>How have you changed during your time at WashU? </strong>I've accepted and learned to love who I am: a transgender woman (and so much more). I applied to WashU lying to both myself and to the world about who I was. Then, while studying abroad in New Zealand, I realized I couldn't keep ignoring who I was. I needed to start living openly and honestly. I slowly started transitioning over the summer and then began my senior year living a double life. Each day I put on a mask and costume to go to campus and only a select group of people knew who I really was.</p><blockquote>Thankfully, this past semester (my final one at WashU) has been my best one yet.</blockquote> I'm living life outside of the closet, and, though I've lost some friends, I’ve gotten closer with others and made many new ones. Most importantly, I'm happier than I ever imagined was possible and have learned more about life in the past year than I had in the 21 years before it. <div><p> <br/> </p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><h3> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/Sydney_0165.JPG?RenditionID=7" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/>Sydney Katz<br/></h3><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p> <strong>What is something you know now that you wish you had known on your first day at WashU?</strong></p><p></p><blockquote>I wish I had known about the engineering tutor program earlier. It is a great way to get some extra help in a class from somebody who has taken it before, and it is free for all engineering students!</blockquote><p> <strong>What was one piece of advice you got as a student that has stuck with you? </strong>During a talk given by the center director at one of my internships, he said, “You know you’re a leader when there is a problem and everyone in the room looks at you.” I think that this is a really cool way to look at leadership, and it has shaped the way that I try to make an impact in the various groups I am involved with.<br/> </p><p> <strong>What makes you want to be an engineer? </strong>I have always loved working with others to solve challenging problems, and there is certainly no shortage of hard problems in engineering. Engineers get to work on the big stuff like sending spacecraft to Mars or creating cars that drive by themselves, and they do so in extremely collaborative teams. It is the perfect fit for me!<br/></p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><h3> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/Nikhil%20Patel.jpg?RenditionID=7" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/>Nikhil Patel<br/></h3><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p> <strong></strong> <strong>What is something you know now that you wish you had known on your first day at WashU?</strong></p><blockquote>Collaboration is the only way to make it through engineering here. </blockquote><p>Getting together with a group of people to work through a problem set is always more fun than doing it on your own (even if it takes little bit longer).</p><p> <strong>Which professors would you recommend new students get to know? </strong>Professor Widder!!! I have spent more time in her lab than in any other room in an engineering building as a student, TA, or just as a work place. She’s an incredible teacher but is also a delight to chat with.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p> <strong>What is one thing from your time as a WashU engineering student that you will take with you in your next step? </strong>I will never forget the frog dissections I did in QP (Quantitative Physiology) lab because they made me feel like a surgeon! It’s ironic to me that my favorite engineering class is actually one that has motivated me to go to medical school.<br/></p> <br/> <p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"> <br/> </p><h3> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/Vanessa%20Wu.jpg?RenditionID=7" class="ms-rtePosition-2" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/>Vanessa Wu<br/></h3><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p> <strong>Where was your favorite place to study at WashU? </strong>Third floor of Green Hall! There are two big round tables there, and the area is bright, spacious, and quiet. The close proximity to Kayaks and Forest Park is also a huge plus in case I need study breaks.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p> <strong>Was there a class that you started out not liking or were struggling in that turned out to be one of your favorite classes or most valuable?</strong> Conflict Management and Negotiation. The only reason this class got on my radar was because it was required, and even then, I waited until my last semester to take it. I expected a lot of reading and writing (at least by Engineering standards), but I didn’t expect how practical and applicable it could be. Working through a negotiation simulation and understanding different conflict management approaches were such valuable experiences.</p><blockquote> Ultimately, what you get out of these type of classes really depends on how much you put in.<br/></blockquote> <p> <strong>What is one thing from your time as a WashU engineering student that you will take with you in your next step? </strong>Being a WashU engineering student and balancing academic with extracurricular activities and other pursuits is not easy. I have definitely felt overwhelmed and have thought about settling and just being “good enough.” However, nothing comes easy. The only way to learn is to keep challenging and pushing ourselves.<br/></p></div>2017 Commencement Speaker Greg Hyslop, chief technology officer of The Boeing Co.2018-04-18T05:00:00Z​Jessi Gray, Sydney Katz, Nikhil Patel and Vanessa Wu will speak at the 2018 Engineering Recognition Ceremony on May 17.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Guertler-Kavadiya-receive-Association-of-Women-Faculty-Graduate-Student-Awards.aspx849Guertler, Kavadiya receive Association of Women Faculty Graduate Student Awards<img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/brookings.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>Charlotte Guertler, a doctoral student in mechanical engineering & materials science, and Shalinee Kavadiya, a doctoral student in energy, environmental & chemical engineering, have been selected to receive a 2018 Association of Women Faculty Graduate Student Award. The awards recognize academic excellence and leadership potential among women students in the second year of graduate school or beyond. Each will receive her award May 1.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Guertler is a student in the lab of Philip Bayly, chair and the Lilyan & E. Lisle Hughes Professor of Mechanical Engineering. Kavadiya is a student in the lab of Pratim Biswas, chair and the Lucy and Stanley Lopata Professor of Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering.<br/></p>2018-04-16T05:00:00Z
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/High-school-students-attend-STEM-empowerment-summit-at-WashU.aspx847High school students attend STEM empowerment summit at WashU<p>​The School of Engineering & Applied Science recently hosted two unique groups of middle and high school students to empower them to pursue degrees and careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). <br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/Pages/SlideshowSTEMDay/180316_sjh_engineering_stem_summit_83.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>Frank Wilson, who earned a master of construction management program from the School of Engineering & Applied Science in 2010, coordinated the events with <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Joseph-OSullivan.aspx">Joseph O’Sullivan, professor and dean of the University of Missouri-St. Louis/Washington University in St. Louis Joint Undergraduate Engineering Program and the Samuel C. Sachs Professor of Electrical Engineering</a> at WashU. Wilson, who owns BFW Construction Co. and is an adjunct professor in the UMSL/WashU Joint Program, and O’Sullivan brought 100 high school students in foster care to campus March 15, where they heard from alumni, motivational speakers and entrepreneurs.</p><p>On March 16, nearly 170 students from seven area high schools took part in a STEM Youth Empowerment and Leadership Summit, during which a variety of business people, engineers and elected officials participated in presentations and discussions. In addition, 40 WashU students from the Engineers in the Community course held during Spring Break, teamed with groups of the high school students at lunch to talk and to answer questions, as well as to give tours of the Engineering and science buildings and labs.</p><br/><br/><a class="widget_button teal" data-lightbox="album" data-title="Frank Wilson" href="/news/PublishingImages/Pages/SlideshowSTEMDay/180316_CLG_STEM_Youth_Leadership_1209.jpg?RenditionID=9" style="padding: 1.2em 0px;">>> View STEM Summit photo album</a> <div style="display: none;"> <a data-lightbox="album" href="/news/PublishingImages/Pages/SlideshowSTEMDay/180316_sjh_engineering_stem_summit_05.jpg?RenditionID=9"> </a><a data-lightbox="album" data-title="Jody O'Sullivan" href="/news/PublishingImages/Pages/SlideshowSTEMDay/180316_sjh_engineering_stem_summit_13.jpg?RenditionID=9"> </a><a data-lightbox="album" href="/news/PublishingImages/Pages/SlideshowSTEMDay/180316_CLG_STEM_Youth_Leadership_3742.jpg?RenditionID=9"> </a><a data-lightbox="album" href="/news/PublishingImages/Pages/SlideshowSTEMDay/180316_CLG_STEM_Youth_Leadership_1263.jpg?RenditionID=9"> </a><a data-lightbox="album" href="/news/PublishingImages/Pages/SlideshowSTEMDay/180316_CLG_STEM_Youth_Leadership_1300.jpg?RenditionID=9"> </a><a data-lightbox="album" href="/news/PublishingImages/Pages/SlideshowSTEMDay/180316_CLG_STEM_Youth_Leadership_3778.jpg?RenditionID=9"> </a><a data-lightbox="album" href="/news/PublishingImages/Pages/SlideshowSTEMDay/180316_CLG_STEM_Youth_Leadership_1230.jpg?RenditionID=9"> </a><a data-lightbox="album" href="/news/PublishingImages/Pages/SlideshowSTEMDay/180316_sjh_engineering_stem_summit_08.jpg?RenditionID=9"> </a><a data-lightbox="album" href="/news/PublishingImages/Pages/SlideshowSTEMDay/180316_CLG_STEM_Youth_Leadership_1240.jpg?RenditionID=9"> </a><a data-lightbox="album" href="/news/PublishingImages/Pages/SlideshowSTEMDay/180316_sjh_engineering_stem_summit_83.jpg?RenditionID=9"> </a> </div> <br/>2018-04-10T05:00:00ZNearly 170 students from seven area high schools toured engineering and science buildings and labs.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Alums-net-notable-NSF-Graduate-Research-Fellowships.aspx843WashU engineers net notable NSF Graduate Research Fellowships <p>​Four Engineering students and two alumni have been offered the highly competitive National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. <br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/141020_jwb_brookings_007-1915x768.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/36_.000">a</a></div><p>The program supports outstanding graduate students in NSF-supported science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines who are pursuing research-based master's and doctoral degrees in the United States. The fellowship comes with a three-year annual stipend of $34,000 along with a $12,000 cost of education allowance, opportunities for international research and professional development and the opportunity to conduct his or her own research. Previous fellows include former U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Google founder Sergey Brin and numerous Nobel Prize winners. </p><p>For the 2018 competition, NSF received more than 12,000 applications and made 2,000 award offers. Recipients include 1,156 women, 461 individuals from underrepresented minority groups, 75 persons with disabilities and 27 veterans. Nearly 1,500 students received honorable mentions, which is considered a significant national academic achievement.</p><h3>The new fellows from WashU are: </h3><p><strong></strong></p><p><strong>Amy Brummer</strong>, who earned a bachelor’s in chemical engineering in 2015, currently a doctoral student at Georgia Institute of Technology;<br/></p><p><strong>Brittany Brumback</strong>, a PhD student in biomedical engineering;<br/></p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p><strong>Audrey Dang</strong>, a PhD student in energy, environmental & chemical engineering;</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p><strong></strong><strong>Makai Mann</strong>, who earned a bachelor’s and master’s in systems science & engineering in 2016, currently a doctoral student at Stanford University;</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p><strong>Emily Ramey</strong>, a senior earning a bachelor’s in physics and a master’s in computer science, who plans to begin graduate school at WashU.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p><strong>Mary Olivia Gail Richardson</strong>, who earned bachelor’s degrees in biomedical engineering and computer science in 2017.<br/></p><p> </p><h3>Those receiving honorable mentions include: </h3><p><strong>Kinan Alhallak</strong>, a doctoral student in biomedical engineering; </p><p><strong>Bryce Bagley</strong>, a senior majoring in computer science and applied science (systems science & engineering); </p><p><strong>Jeremy Eekhoff</strong>, a doctoral student in biomedical engineering;</p><p><strong>Molly Klimak</strong>, a doctoral student in biomedical engineering;</p><p><strong>Huy Lam</strong>, who earned a bachelor's in biomedical engineering 2016, currently a doctoral student at the University of California, San Diego;</p><p><strong>Zachary Rouse</strong>, who earned a bachelor's in mechanical engineering 2016, currently a doctoral student at Cornell University.<br/></p><SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN><p><br/></p>Beth Miller 2018-04-05T05:00:00Z Previous fellows include former U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Google founder Sergey Brin and numerous Nobel Prize winners.