EECE Seminar: "Can Global Temperature Rise be Limited to 2 Degrees? The Cold Turkey Experiment"https://engineering.wustl.edu/Events/Pages/EECE-Schwartz.aspx849EECE Seminar: "Can Global Temperature Rise be Limited to 2 Degrees? The Cold Turkey Experiment"2017-03-31T05:00:00Z11 a.m.Brauer Hall, Room 12<p><a href="https://eece.wustl.edu/eeceatwashu/Documents/seminar%2017/Schwartz%20Flyer.pdf">​Stephen E. Schwartz</a>, Senior Scientist, Brookhaven National Laboratory, will present.<br/></p><p><strong>Abstract:</strong> The 2015 Paris Agreement stipulates that the signatory nations take collective action to reduce carbon dioxide emissions so as to limit the increase in global mean surface temperature to 2˚C. How much would CO2 emissions have to be reduced to achieve this, or can this even be achieved at all? These questions are examined using a global energy balance model to carry out a “cold turkey” experiment in which emissions from fossil fuel combustion are abruptly set equal to zero; this is a limiting case for any practically feasible, gradual reduction in emissions. Such emission reductions would not only reduce CO2 emissions but would also reduce emissions of atmospheric aerosols, microscopic particles suspended in air, and their precursor gases. By scattering solar radiation and by increasing cloud reflectivity these aerosols are thought to be offsetting a substantial but highly uncertain fraction of radiative forcing by anthropogenic carbon dioxide. In contrast to carbon dioxide, which would persist in the atmosphere, aerosols would be removed almost immediately after cessation of emissions. Consequently, and contrary to general expectation, the net forcing and global temperature would likely increase, not decrease. This study examines the amount of the resultant temperature rise within present uncertainty estimates of Earth’s climate sensitivity and current aerosol forcing. Within this uncertainty, future global CO2 emissions consistent with achieving the 2 ˚C target range from as much as 100 years at current emission rates to essentially zero. <br/></p><p>Host: Rajan Chakrabarty<br/></p>Kara Dix, kdix@wustl.edu
2017 Sustainability Summithttps://engineering.wustl.edu/Events/Pages/One-STL-Summit.aspx8642017 Sustainability Summit2017-04-05T05:00:00ZNoonEric P. Newman Education Center on Medical School Campus <p>At the 2017 Sustainability Summit, attendees will learn and apply innovative approaches to setting and achieving sustainability targets for the St. Louis region through knowledge sharing and networking. The St. Louis region has a robust foundation for sustainability efforts: a strong, collectively developed regional sustainability plan (OneSTL), a thorough City of St. Louis Sustainability Plan, and a multitude of efforts, individuals, and initiatives dedicated to making our region a more sustainable and resilient place. The summit will address 7 themes: biodiversity, buildings/land use, energy/emissions, food, materials, transportation, and water/green infrastructure. Local governments, non-profits, elected officials, infrastructure providers, community leaders, academics, students, and other attendees will learn from regional and national leaders striving to set and achieve sustainability goals. Together, we will grow our capacity to advance the St. Louis region  towards a sustainable, resilient and equitable future. Registration ends March 30.   <a href="https://www.onestlsustainabilitysummit.org/">Learn more</a><br/></p>Register for the event at https://commerce.cashnet.com/cashneti/selfserve/EditItem.aspx?PC=OOS-SUMMIT&ItemCount=1
2017 Sustainability Summithttps://engineering.wustl.edu/Events/Pages/One-STL-Summit-2.aspx865 2017 Sustainability Summit2017-04-06T05:00:00Z8 a.m.Eric P. Newman Education Center on Medical School Campus <p>​At the 2017 Sustainability Summit, attendees will learn and apply innovative approaches to setting and achieving sustainability targets for the St. Louis region through knowledge sharing and networking. The St. Louis region has a robust foundation for sustainability efforts: a strong, collectively developed regional sustainability plan (OneSTL), a thorough City of St. Louis Sustainability Plan, and a multitude of efforts, individuals, and initiatives dedicated to making our region a more sustainable and resilient place. The summit will address 7 themes: biodiversity, buildings/land use, energy/emissions, food, materials, transportation, and water/green infrastructure. Local governments, non-profits, elected officials, infrastructure providers, community leaders, academics, students, and other attendees will learn from regional and national leaders striving to set and achieve sustainability goals. Together, we will grow our capacity to advance the St. Louis region  towards a sustainable, resilient and equitable future. Registration ends March 30.   <a href="https://www.onestlsustainabilitysummit.org/" style="background-color: #ffffff;">Learn more</a><br/></p>Organizer: Register for the event at https://commerce.cashnet.com/cashneti/selfserve/EditItem.aspx?PC=OOS-SUMMIT&ItemCount=1
EECE Seminar: "Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Fuels and Chemicals"https://engineering.wustl.edu/Events/Pages/EECE-Seminar-Dumesic.aspx850EECE Seminar: "Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Fuels and Chemicals"2017-04-07T05:00:00Z11 a.m.Brauer Hall, Room 12<p><a href="https://eece.wustl.edu/eeceatwashu/Documents/seminar%2017/Dumesic%20Flyer.pdf">​James A. Dumesic</a>, Chairman Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin, will present.<br/></p><p><strong>ABSTRACT:</strong> Lignocellulosic biomass is an important renewable source of carbon for the sustainable production of fuels, chemicals, and materials. Presented here is our recent work on catalytic processing of biomass, with an emphasis on the synthesis of new catalytic materials and the elucidation of solvent effects for these processes. Specifically, a,wdiols were produced from biomassderived reactants with bimetallic catalysts (e.g, RhRe, RhMo, PtMo) . The active sites on these bimetallic catalysts are bi-functional in nature, where the more reducible metal (Rh, Pt) catalyzes hydrogenation/dehydrogenation processes, and the more oxophilic metal (Re, Mo) provides sites that facilitate acid-catalyzed reactions. These bimetallic catalysts were synthesized with controlled compositions by the deposition of organometallic compounds onto the surfaces of metal nanoparticles. The effects of polar aprotic organic solvents on reaction rates and selectivities of acid catalyzed reactions of relevance for biomass conversion (e.g., xylose and fructose dehydration to furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural, respectively) were quantified by reaction kinetics studies. The aprotic organic solvent affects the stabilization of the acidic proton relative to the protonated transition states, leading to accelerated reaction rates for these acid-catalyzed biomass conversion reactions. This solvent effect was employed to develop a biomass processing approach that uses gamma-valerolactone (GVL) as a solvent to fractionate biomass to produce soluble carbohydrates from corn stover, hardwood and softwood at high yields (80- 90%). These carbohydrates can then be recovered and concentrated (up to 150 g/L) in an aqueous phase or converted to produce furandicarboxylic acid.<br/></p>For more information contact Kara Dix at kdix@wustl.edu
EECE Seminarhttps://engineering.wustl.edu/Events/Pages/EECE-Seminar-Brown.aspx851EECE Seminar2017-04-14T05:00:00Z11 a.m.Brauer Hall, Room 12<p><a href="http://www.me.iastate.edu/directory/faculty/robert-c-brown/">Robert Brown</a>, Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University will present.<br/></p><p>Host: Dr. Foston<br/></p>For more information contact Kara Dix at kdix@wustl.edu
EECE Seminar: AEESP Distinguished Lecturerhttps://engineering.wustl.edu/Events/Pages/EESE-Seminar-Elimelech.aspx852EECE Seminar: AEESP Distinguished Lecturer2017-04-21T05:00:00Z11 a.m.Brauer Hall, Room 12<p>​<span>Meny Elimelech, Professor, </span><span>Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, </span><span>Yale University will present.</span><br/></p><p><span>Host: Dr. Giammar</span></p>For more information contact Kara Dix at kdix@wustl.edu
I-CARES 10th Anniversary Celebrationhttps://engineering.wustl.edu/Events/Pages/ICARES-Anniversary.aspx902I-CARES 10th Anniversary Celebration2017-04-22T05:00:00Z3 p.m.5 p.m.Frick Forum, Knight Hall<p>​2017 marks the ten-year anniversary for the International Center for Advanced Renewable Energy and Sustainability (I-CARES) as the hub for progressive innovations being achieved by the Washington University community in energy, environment and sustainability. Please join Chancellor Mark S. Wrighton, I-CARES and the university community to learn more about the great work being done on campus. The event will conclude with a networking reception.<br/></p><p><a href="https://icares.wustl.edu/event/register-for-i-cares-april-22nd-event/">>> Register to attend.</a><br/></p>Courtney Chazen, 314-935-8093
EECE Class Presentationshttps://engineering.wustl.edu/Events/Pages/EECE-Class-Presentations.aspx853EECE Class Presentations2017-04-28T05:00:00Z11 a.m.Brauer Hall, Room 12<p>ChE 478A, Process & Product Design students will present their final projects.<br/></p>Kim Coleman, 314-935-5548
EECE Seminarhttps://engineering.wustl.edu/Events/Pages/EECE-Seminar-Nguyen-Helen.aspx863EECE Seminar2017-05-05T05:00:00Z11 a.m.Brauer Hall, Room 12<p>​<a href="http://cee.illinois.edu/directory/profile/thn">Helen Nguyen</a><span>, Associate Professor, </span><span>Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, </span><span>University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, will present.</span><br/></p><p><span>Host: Dr. Giammar</span><br/></p>For more information contact Kara Dix at kdix@wustl.edu
Commencement: Engineering Student Recognition Ceremonyhttps://engineering.wustl.edu/Events/Pages/Engineering-Student-Recognition-Ceremony.aspx567Commencement: Engineering Student Recognition Ceremony2017-05-18T05:00:00Z1:30 p.m.Field House, Athletic Complex<p>Students (undergraduate, graduate and PhD) should arrive for lineup before 12:45 p.m. in the lower level hallway. Upon arrival, students should obtain a name card and complete the information requested on the back. <span style="line-height: 25.6px;">Students should carry (not wear) hoods.</span><br/></p><p><strong>Reception locations following the ceremony:</strong></p><ul><li><strong>Biomedical Engineering: </strong>Whitaker Hall</li><li><strong>Computer Science & Engineering:</strong> Sever Plaza</li><li><strong>Electrical & Systems Engineering:</strong> Green Hall </li><li><strong>Energy, Environmental & Chemical Engineering:</strong> Brauer Hall </li><li><strong>Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science:</strong> Lopata Hall</li></ul>Kim Shilling, (314) 935-6100
Commencementhttps://engineering.wustl.edu/Events/Pages/All-University-Commencement-2017.aspx568Commencement2017-05-19T05:00:00Z8:30 a.m.Brookings Quadrangle<p>Engineering students lineup along Louderman Hall. <span style="line-height: inherit;">PhD stude</span><span style="line-height: inherit;">nts assemble with the Graduate School next to Wilson Hall.</span>​</p>
No Classes (Independence Day)https://engineering.wustl.edu/Events/Pages/End-summer-session.aspx697No Classes (Independence Day)2017-07-04T05:00:00ZEngineering Student Services, (314) 935-6100